WELCOME TO
MOREWAYS
http://www.frontier.net/~grifftoe/moreways.html 
The Teahouse of Experience
© 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2011 by The Teahouse of  Experience
Unless you edit your bookmarks' properties and folders they are identified by page title and arranged, by default, in the order you acquired them, which doesn't always tell you why you bookmarked them. FIT THE WEB TO YOUR WORK
When you use a web search engine your results may list millions of pages, not all of which will be relevant to your inquiry, and you rarely look at more than 20 results anyway. Just choose one relevant page and put its address into
  MOREWAYS - you'll get more relevant results!
You can find out how you got somewhere by looking at your History or Go lists, but that doesn't tell you what other pages are linked to the page in your current browser window.

More ways to work the web
TRY IT HERE MOREWAYS
Type in or paste any web page or site address and Click:

http://     & CLOSE NEW

    You'll get four new browser windows - look for them on your Windows Task bar:Down on the Task Bar
  • the page you entered
  • an AltaVista list of pages that link to the page you entered
  • a HotBot list of pages that link to the page you entered
  • a Google list of pages that link to the page you entered
You can check OnlineUniversities.net for statistics on search engines.
MOREWAYS - the world-wide web from another point of view:
the web is more than a two-way path, it goes everywhere at once.
CHAIN

CHAIN

CHAIN

When world-wide web users surf, browse, or search for information they follow links from one page to another. The 'most useful' pages traditionally provide links to lots of other, relevant pages, so people bookmark specific pages about their favorite things or pages which contain lots of links to pages about their favorite things. When you're seeking information you typically follow chains of links from a 'useful' page, for example, a search engine results page, or a bookmarked page.
Browser 'Back' and 'Forward' buttons make it easy to navigate chains but, I believe, tend to make you look at the web one way at a time.
MORE
WAYS
TO
WORK
THE
WEB
There is a type of information service called 'Source and Citation' research - finding the most important works in a field by tracing references backwards. When I look at the web as a state space instead of a chain I conclude that it would help to be able to see what pages link to what ever your current, active page is.

Comments welcome, please send email to Dr. John Griffiths: grifftoe@frontier.net

BEST VIEWED AT 800 X 600 OR BETTER SCREEN SIZE
More ways to work the web NOT
CURRENT
CURRENT

A MOUSEOVER GUIDE
NOT
ACTIVE

ACTIVE
CHAIN

CHAIN

CHAIN

Chain chain chainWhen world-wide web users surf, browse, or search for information they follow links from one page to another. Some may surf with more than one window open, but navigation is pretty much kept in a line. You can still see web sites built from a 'strict line' sequence point of view: one page is linked to the next, or back; in a chain, a chain in what is actually a web.

FOUR

STATE

MODEL

A state model is a simple way of looking at the relationship between web pages and browser link chains. Suppose we say that pages are either ACTIVE or NOT ACTIVE, and CURRENT or NOT CURRENT; a page can be in one of four states: (see the mouseOver Guide, above)
  • ACTIVE, CURRENT
    The page in your current browser window.
  • NOT ACTIVE, CURRENT
    A page linked FROM the page in your current browser window,
    the next page in a chain of links.
  • NOT ACTIVE, NOT CURRENT
    The rest of the web.
  • ACTIVE, NOT CURRENT
    A page linked TO the page in your current browser window,
    including pages you have visited AND pages you haven't visited.
The question is, "Can you model a web this way?"
ITS A

WORLD

WIDE

WEB

The state model illustrates that the rest of the world-wide web cannot be seen as links in a chain. Although you can imagine that those other pages are linked somehow, you can't see them if they're not on your chain. The state model shows us that there can be other, relevant pages out there too even if they're not on your chain. Moreways demonstrates that knowing what pages link TO any page gives you more of the web to work with.

TECHNICAL NOTE: Javascript implements a method by which all the links on a page can be identified - the multi window MoreWays arrangement is a kluge of the more interesting javascript single window/multiple frames implementation I started with. It turned out that a standard security feature in Java Script prevents a page script from obtaining values for the links[ ] array object of any page not originating on the same server. So its seems that somebody thought of all this long ago and its a great feature for automating a server. . .
If you'd like a copy of the javascript version please let me know, thanks.

The Teahouse of Experience Thanks for visiting MoreWays

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